RenaSci

Neurochemistry

Neurochemicals Assays

 

RenaSci offers a range of neurochemical assays for investigating the ability of drugs to interfere with the synthesis, metabolism, release or reuptake of neurotransmitters in vitro or ex vivo. Examples include : -


•    3H monoamine uptake in vitro
•    Inhibition of monoamine oxidase A and B activity in mouse and rat brain in vitro
•    Inhibition of 5-HT and noradrenaline turnover (5-HTP and MHPG formation) ex vivo

Clonidine Reduces Unconjugated MHPG, an Indicator of Noradrenaline Turnover in Rat and Mouse Brain

 

We also offer 'neurochemical fingerprinting'  in mice - an  ex vivo screen to discriminate between drugs with different presynaptic dopaminergic mechanisms. The model has been validated by studying the effects of a variety of indirect dopamine mimetic drugs on levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum and prefrontal cortex.

 

Neurochemical Fingerprinting 

GBR 12909 is a dopamine reuptake inhibitor, d-amphetamine is a monoamine releasing agent, methylphenidate is a catecholaminergic stimulant, MK-801 is a NMDA receptor antagonist and tranylcypromine is an irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitor. These drugs, which act via different presynaptic mechanisms, produce unique patterns of effects on dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum and prefrontal cortex reflecting the different presynaptic regulation of dopamine release and metabolism in these two brain regions. This ex vivo screen can therefore be used to characterise the effects of novel compounds on presynaptic dopaminergic function and to compare them to those of reference compounds including  drugs of abuse.

 

Please get in touch for further information about neurochemical fingerprinting and our other neurochemical assays.

 

Posters

 

Babbs et al. 2006 PSN S1 & PSN S2 are novel 5-HT1A agonists and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors which show anti-feeding efficacy and superior cardiovascular safety to sibutramine in rats. Program No 62.3. Society for Neuroscience Meeting, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 14th-18th October 2006.

 

Cheetham et al. 2005. Ex vivo occupancy as a technique to assess drug actions at multiple targets. Program No. 447.6. Society for Neuroscience Meeting, Washington, DC, USA, 12th-16th November 2005.

 

Cheetham  et al. 2010. Differences in presynaptic mechanisms of the ADHD drugs, d-amphetamine and methylphenidate, revealed by "neurochemical fingerprinting”: correlations between dopamine neurochemistry and behavioural function. Program No 669.21. Society for Neuroscience Meeting, San Diego, California, USA, 13th-17th November 2010.

 

Cheetham et al. 2014. Binge-eating behaviour produces alterations in dopaminergic neurochemistry in the brains of rats. Program No.233.04. Society for Neuroscience Meeting, Washington, DC, USA, 15th-19th November 2014.

 

Heal et al. 2009. “Neurochemical fingerprinting” as a rapid technique to discriminate between drugs with different presynaptic dopaminergic mechanisms. Program No. 421.2. Society for Neuroscience Meeting, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 17th-21st October 2009.

 

Heal et al. 2010. Further validation of “neurochemical fingerprinting” to characterise drugs with different presynaptic dopaminergic mechanisms: comparison with in vivo microdialysis. Program No. 669.22. Society for Neuroscience Meeting, San Diego, California, USA, 13th-17th November 2010.

 

Sood et al. 2012. Profound suppression of noradrenaline, dopamine and 5-HT turnover in various regions of rat brain evoked by the alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine. British Association for Psychopharmacology  Summer Meeting, Harrogate, UK, 22nd-25th July 2012. Abstract No TE06. J. Psychopharm. Vol 26, Issue 8, August 2012.

 

Manuscripts

 

Heal et al. 2017. Dopamine and μ-opioid receptor dysregulation in the brains of binge-eating female rats - possible relevance in the psychopathology and treatment of binge-eating disorder. J. Psychopharmacol. 2017 Apr 1. doi: 10.1177/0269881117699607. [Epub ahead of print] [PubMed]