RenaSci

Body Composition Analysis

Body Composition Analysis

 

Body composition analysis can be used to investigate whether potential antiobesity drugs reduce body weight by producing a clinically-beneficial selective loss of fat or by producing non-specific decreases in water (dehydration) and/or protein content (muscle wasting or cachexia) which can be harmful. Body composition analysis can be determined by classical chemical analysis or using a FoodScan™ near infra-red meat analyser. This machine has received AOAC (Association of Official Analytical Chemists) approval as a reference method for the analysis of moisture, fat and protein in meat and meat products.

 

Key features of the gold-standard chemical analysis method are :-

 

     •     Suitable for rats and mice
     •     Measures carcass fat (Soxhlet), carcass water (freeze drying), carcass protein
           (Kjeldahl) and carcass ash (furnace)
     •     The measurement of ash (bone mass) means that it is more precise than any other
           method.

 

Determination of Body Composition by Chemical Analysis

 

Chemical analysis can be used to determine faecal fat, protein, water and ash content and also the composition of individual tissues if required eg total liver fat content.

 

Key features of body composition analysis performed using the FoodScan™ analyser are :-

 

     •     Methodology validated in rats
     •     Measures carcass fat, water and protein content but not ash
     •     Cost effective and quick alternative producing virtually identical body
           composition results to those obtained using chemical analysis 

Body Composition Analysis Techniques

 

All analyses can be performed on tissues and carcasses from studies performed at RenaSci or at other facilities. 

 

Please contact us for further information about chemical analysis of tissues or carcasses or determination of body composition using the FoodScan analyser.

 

Posters

 

Cheetham et al. 2008. Effect of the MCH1 antagonist, GW803430, on body weight, food and water intake, glucose tolerance, fat pad weight, ex vivo binding and various plasma parameters in dietary-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. Program No. 584.24. Society for Neuroscience Meeting, Washington, DC, 15th-19th November 2008.

 

Dickinson et al. 2008. The effect of chronic administration of sibutramine on body composition in dietary-induced obese female Wistar rats – an evaluation of the Foss FoodScan™ analyser. BPS Winter Meeting, Brighton, 2008.

 

Jackson et al. 2004. Comparison of the effects of sibutramine and orlistat on body weight, food and water intake and body composition in dietary-induced obese rats.  Program No. 76.19. Society for Neuroscience Meeting, San Diego, California, 23rd-27th October 2004.

 

Jackson et al. 2005. Comparison of the effects of rimonabant and sibutramine in a rat model of dietary induced obesity. Program No. 532.13. Society for Neuroscience Meeting, Washington, DC, 12th-16th November 2005.

 

Vickers et al. 2005. Comparison of the effects of rimonabant, sibutramine and orlistat on acute food intake and in a model of dietary induced obesity in the mouse. Program No. 532.12. Society for Neuroscience Meeting, Washington, DC, 12th-16th November 2005.